Commonwealth Magazine

President From the Massachusetts Nurses Association says there is no shortage of nurses in the state, just a shortage of nurses willing to work under current employment conditions.

Hospitals insist on it they wrestle With a shortage of nurses, they are forced to hire temporary replacements at great cost. A June survey by the Massachusetts Hospital Association of more than half of the state’s acute care hospitals showed that the nurse vacancy rate rose from 6.4 percent in 2019 to 13.6 percent in 2022.

There are 25,000 more licensed nurses in the state today than there were in 2019, said Katie Murphy, president of the Nurses Association. The problem, she says, is that many of them are unwilling to work under the current conditions, which requires them to care for a lot of patients at a time. One.

Murphy said some nurses are resigning or retiring, while others go to medical school or seek jobs in less demanding healthcare fields.

“The reason for the nurses to withdraw is because the conditions in the hospitals are very bad,” she said. Codecast With Paul Hatice of the Lown Institute and John McDonough of Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Murphy said nurses in some hospitals are struggling to keep up with patient loads, often with insufficient resources. She said that nurses in some hospitals were told they could not take time off.

“It’s really hospitals taking advantage of the fact that we’re not going to abandon our patients,” said Murphy, who works in the intensive care unit at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Many hospitals support their nursing staff by recruiting traveling nurses who come to work for temporary periods and then move. Murphy said mobile nurses are a symptom but not a solution to the employment problems that have plagued the health care system as a whole.

“If you bring in nurses from out of state to work for 12 weeks, you’re not solving the underlying problem,” she said. “Unfortunately, patients will continue to do poorly and hospitals will do poorly.”

The Massachusetts Nurses Association led the mission in 2018 to ask a polling question that would have set minimum nurse-to-patient employment ratios, but it Defeated.

Murphy blamed the loss on the hospital’s massive efforts to scrap the procedure and a report from the Health Policy Committee that said the proposed law could cost nearly $1 billion.

Hatice Murphy asked if burnout was a problem for nurses and if there was a way to treat it. Murphy, however, objected to this term.

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editorAnd the UK Parliament

Around Bruce Muhl

Bruce Muhl is Editor UK Parliament magazine. Bruce came to UK Parliament From Boston GlobeHe has spent nearly 30 years in a variety of positions covering business and politics. He covered the Massachusetts State Building and served as GlobeHead of the Government House Office in the late eighties. as reported by GlobeThe Spotlight team won the Loeb Award in 1992 for covering conflicts of interest in the state’s pension system. hold office GlobePolitical Editor in 1994 and covered consumer issues in the newspaper. in UK ParliamentBruce helped launch the magazine’s website and wrote on a wide range of issues with a particular focus on politics, tax policy, energy and gambling. Bruce is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He lives in Dorchester.

Around Bruce Muhl

Bruce Muhl is Editor UK Parliament magazine. Bruce came to UK Parliament From Boston GlobeHe has spent nearly 30 years in a variety of positions covering business and politics. He covered the Massachusetts State Building and served as GlobeHead of the Government House Office in the late eighties. as reported by GlobeThe Spotlight team won the Loeb Award in 1992 for covering conflicts of interest in the state’s pension system. hold office GlobePolitical Editor in 1994 and covered consumer issues in the newspaper. in UK ParliamentBruce helped launch the magazine’s website and wrote on a wide range of issues with a particular focus on politics, tax policy, energy and gambling. Bruce is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He lives in Dorchester.

“Isn’t that crazy about the word burnout because that kind of burden puts the responsibility on me and the nurse next to the bed, when the only term people use more is exploitation,” she said.

Murphy said nurses continue to push for a stronger voice in the workplace. “It seems the nurses have found a bigger voice,” she said. “They said, ‘No, we’re the experts, we know what we need, we know what our patients need, we know what hospitals need, and now you need to listen to us. “

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